Review: Stalker

Review: Stalker

Dissecting Stalker is something that could be (and often is) done in third or fourth year university film programs. There is a litany of ways to look at this film, from simply admiring the atmosphere it creates to character analysis to digging through its larger philosophical point, and this write-up is more a collection of…

Review: Cloud Atlas

Review: Cloud Atlas

If I had to boil my interpretation down to a concise thought (which is hard here), it’s that the point of the revolving plots are to illustrate how human life is spent in a constant push/pull between self-interest and selflessness; no matter how far back or how far into the future we go, it’s the nature of who we are. And as we see again and again throughout the film, whichever impulse we act on will affect our own life as much as the lives of those after us.

Review: There Will Be Blood

Review: There Will Be Blood

The era that There Will Be Blood is set during is such a romanticized period of time in this country. The turn of the century was when you could move out west, buy land, and really “make yourself.” I’m sure that there were people who pursued that nobly, but I bet for a large swath their attitude was less about independence and freedom, and more about profit.

Review: The Revenant
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Review: The Revenant

A tale of isolation and wilderness survival might work well in a novel (Michael Punke penned the book upon which The Revenant is based) but it’s difficult at best to translate into cinematic form, and The Revenant sat in production limbo for nearly a decade before the script found its way to screenwriter Mark Smith. Even after Alejandro Iñárritu signed on to direct in 2011, it took another three years for filming to begin. Was it worth the wait? Unquestionably.

Review: Mad Max: Fury Road
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Review: Mad Max: Fury Road

Over thirty years ago, George Miller used money he saved while working as an emergency doctor to fund his directorial debut, a violent Australian action film titled “Mad Max.” Shot for next to nothing, the film went on to set box office records, launching two legendary sequels that catapulted Mel Gibson to international stardom and influenced decades of post-apocalyptic media. How did Miller follow up such a gritty, highly-regarded trilogy? By producing and co-writing the acclaimed family films Babe and Happy Feet, as well as their sequels.